due


due
due adj Due, rightful, condign are comparable when they mean being in accordance with what is just and appro-priate.
Due, which basically means owed or owing as a debt, carries over in the sense here considered a strong implication that the thing so described is grounded upon an obligation, duty, or debt which should not or cannot be ignored; thus, one who takes due precautions uses the care that is required by his obligation to look out for his own or for others' safety or well-being; one who has a due sense of another person's rights accords to that person all that belongs to him by natural or moral right; one who has due respect for the law observes the individual laws as the duty of a responsible citizen. Often the term implies little more than an accordance with what is right, reasonable, or necessary
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the due relation of one thing with another— Galsworthy

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your due and proper portion— Meredith

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many noncommissioned officers have a firm belief that without a due admixture of curses, an order is inaudible to a private— Montague

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Rightful carries a much stronger and more consistent implication than due of a ground in right and justice, and usually suggests a moral or legal claim
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the rightful heir to the estate

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possess the rightful authority

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looked askance, jealous of an encroacher on his rightful domain— Hawthorne

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the disloyal subject who had fought against his rightful sovereign— Macaulay

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Condign applies to something that is distinctly deserved or merited and usually something that neither exceeds nor falls below one's deserts or merits; the term is used chiefly of punishment, often with the implication of severity
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he had been brought to condign punishment as a traitor— Macaulay

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the particular troubles which involved Messrs. Buecheler and Vahlen in such condign castigation— Housman

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condign punishments set up for violations of the rules of control— Baruch

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Analogous words: appropriate, meet, suitable, *fit, fitting, proper: right, *good: just, *fair, equitable
Contrasted words: *excessive, inordinate, immoderate, extravagant, exorbitant: *deficient
due n Due, desert, merit are comparable when they mean what is justly owed to a person (sometimes a thing), especially as a recompense or compensation.
Due usually implies a legal or moral right on the part of the person or thing that makes the claim or is in a position to make the claim and suggests a determination of what is owed by strict justice
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more is thy due than more than all can pay— Shak.

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carve to all but just enough, let them neither starve nor stuff, and that you may have your due, let your neighbor carve for you— Swift

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giving each man his due . . . impartial as the rain from Heaven's faceLindsay

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Desert (often in plural deserts) suggests not a legal right but a moral right based upon what one actually deserves, whether it be a reward or a penalty
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"My lord, I will use them according to their desert." "God's bodykins, man, much better: use every man after his desert, and who should 'scape whipping?"— Shak.

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you have deprived the best years of his life of that independence which was no less his due than his desertAusten

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any Federal officer, regardless of his deserts, has much prestige— Heiser

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Merit is a somewhat complex term, often shifting in its major implication but (see also EXCELLENCE) com-monly implying a deserving either of reward or punishment on the ground of what has been accomplished or of commendation, esteem, or acceptance on the ground of intrinsic and usually excellent qualities
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no tribute can be paid to them which exceeds their meritJohn Marshall

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deal with every case on its merits

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as a pilgrim to the Holy Places I acquire meritKipling

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Analogous words: compensation, recompensing or recompense, repayment, satisfaction, payment (see corresponding verbs at PAY): retribution, Retaliation, reprisal, vengeance, revenge: reward, meed, guerdon (see PREMIUM)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • due — due …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • due — adj [Old French deu, past participle of devoir to owe, from Latin debere] 1 a: satisfying or capable of satisfying an obligation, duty, or requirement under the law the buyer s due performance under the contract due proof of loss b: proper under… …   Law dictionary

  • due to — 1. The use of due to is one of the key topics of discussion in debates about correct usage, along with infer/imply and the split infinitive. As an adjective meaning ‘owing, payable, attributable, (of an event etc.) intended to happen or arrive’… …   Modern English usage

  • due — [djuː ǁ duː] adjective 1. [not before a noun] if an amount of money is due, it must be paid now or at the stated time: • Breakwater said it was unable to meet an interest payment due yesterday. see also past due 2. [only before a noun] LAW prop …   Financial and business terms

  • due — [do͞o, dyo͞o] adj. [ME < OFr deu, pp. of devoir, to owe < L debere, to owe: see DEBT] 1. owed or owing as a debt, right, etc.; payable [the first payment is due] 2. suitable; fitting; proper [with all due respect] 3. as much as is required; …   English World dictionary

  • due — ► ADJECTIVE 1) owing or payable. 2) expected at or planned for a certain time. 3) (often due to) merited; fitting. 4) at a point where something is owed or merited: he was due for a rise. 5) proper; appropriate: due process of law. ► NOU …   English terms dictionary

  • due — {{hw}}{{due}}{{/hw}}[2 nella numerazione araba, II in quella romana] A agg. num. card. 1 Indica una quantità composta di un unità più uno: l uomo ha due braccia e due gambe. 2 (est.) Pochi (con valore indeterm. per indicare una piccola quantità) …   Enciclopedia di italiano

  • Due — Due, a. [OF. deu, F. d[^u], p. p. of devoir to owe, fr. L. debere. See {Debt}, {Habit}, and cf. {Duty}.] 1. Owed, as a debt; that ought to be paid or done to or for another; payable; owing and demandable. [1913 Webster] 2. Justly claimed as a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • due — due; due·ness; en·due; en·due·ment; sub·due; un·due; ven·due; fon·due; res·i·due; …   English syllables

  • due to — [ du tu ] preposition *** because of something: The company s financial losses were due to poor management. He almost died due to lack of oxygen. largely due to: The negative image of immigrants is largely due to ignorance. partly due to/due in… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English


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